Immunizations for School-Aged Children

If your child has missed any recommended immunizations, talk to his/her healthcare professional (HCP) about “catch-up immunizations.”

Immunizations aren’t just for young children. In fact, there are certain immunizations that are recommended at various stages throughout childhood and on through adulthood.

According to CDC, the United States currently has the safest, most effective vaccine supply in history — and CDC urges people of all ages to receive those immunizations that are recommended for their age and health status. Continue to protect your child’s health by making sure he or she gets timely immunizations to prevent him/her from getting – and spreading — specific diseases.

Immunizations for Ages 11 – 12

TDaP (or DTaP) To prevent diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis
HPV* To prevent cervical cancer (for women) and genital warts
MCV4 To protect against meningitis
Flu Vaccine Recommended annually for all children

*CDC recommends that all girls and women age 11 through 26 years should be vaccinated with 3 doses of HPV vaccine, given over a 6-month period, to protect against cervical cancer and genital warts. Boys and men age 11 through 26 years may also be vaccinated with one of the HPV vaccines to reduce their likelihood of getting genital warts. The vaccine may be given to children as young as age 9.


Talk to your child’s HCP about these recommendations, as well as any questions you might have about immunizations. For CDC’s most current childhood immunization recommendations, go to www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/.

Remember: Immunization is a key aspect of equipping your child to fight illness and germs.

Immunizations for College-Age Students

Young children are not the only ones who need immunizations. In fact, CDC recommends different immunizations at different stages of life, all the way through adulthood.

As your teenager grows, it’s important to continue to protect him or her by making sure he or she gets timely immunizations. And if you have a teenager who is enrolling in college and planning to live in a dormitory, he/she may have exposure to a wider variety of germs than ever before — making it even more critical that vaccinations are up to date.

Immunizations for Age 19 and Beyond

TDaP (or DTaP) To prevent diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (if your child hasn’t had at least 3 in his/her lifetime)
HPV To prevent cervical cancer (for women) and genital warts (if it hasn’t been received already)
MCV4 To protect against meningitis (if it hasn’t been received already)
Pneumococcal If your child smokes cigarettes or has certain medical conditions
Hep A To protect against hepatitis A
Hep B To protect against hepatitis B
Flu Vaccine Recommended annually for everyone

Vaccines for International Travel

If your teen is planning to travel outside the United States — for example, for a study-abroad program — additional vaccines may be necessary. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provide information to assist travelers and their HCPs in deciding the vaccines, medications, and other measures necessary to prevent illness and injury during international travel.

Visit CDC’s website at www.cdc.gov/travel or call (800)-CDC-INFO ([800]-232-4636). You may also consult a travel clinic or your HCP.


Click here for more information about
immunizations for older kids.